Slideshow Comments of the Week

Published
  • July 13 2012, 10:15am EDT
19 Images Total

(Image: Thinkstock)

On the CFPB's practice of bringing enforcement attorneys to bank exams:

"Bringing the Enforcement Lawyer to the Exam -- As one of my good friends stated 'How would you feel if you were a patient in the hospital and your Doctor showed up with the undertaker?'" (Image: Thinkstock)

Related Article: How Specter of Regulatory Capture Shaped CFPB's First Year

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On Well Fargo's $175 million fair-lending settlement:

"Now let me see if I have this straight-Wells just got hit with the first of what may be a series of fines for acts committed by their employees, but they no longer want to do business with brokers in the wholesale market ... Can anyone explain the logic in that?" (Image: Thinkstock)

Related Article: Wells Hit with $85 Million Fine by Fed for Faulty Subprime Loans


On Navy Federal Credit Union's plan to expand business lending:

"What law or authority says that credit unions' tax exemption has anything to do with commercial lending? The banking industry presumes to define what credit unions are; what activities they should engage in; and how they should be regulated." (Image: Thinkstock)

Related Article: Navy Federal Business Loan Program Poses New Banking Threat


On the threat that a bank investor's fraud could raise regulatory barriers to future deals:

"It is a shame that he destroyed MCbank, [Montgomery Bank] but it would be an even greater tragedy for him to destroy other deserving banks and new investors from coming together." (Image: Thinkstock)

Related Article: Georgia Fraud Case Could Complicate Recaps at Small Banks

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On the Treasury's lack of a strategy to wind down the Troubled Asset Relief Program:

"The process is opaque for a reason and it does have everything to do with politics and certain senior individuals trying to keep a bad thing from getting uglier." (Image: Thinkstock)

Related Article: Treasury Lacks True Strategy to Exit Tarp


On the Treasury's lack of a strategy to wind down the Troubled Asset Relief Program:

"The politics are very clear and the actions are designed to create sound bytes for later this fall. The hard question for the Administration will be what have they done with Fannie and Freddie on their watch?" (Image: Thinkstock)

Related Article: Treasury Lacks True Strategy to Exit Tarp


On the arrival of Chinese banks into the U.S.:

"If the Chinese banks are required to follow the same regulatory paradigm that American banks are subject to, especially when it comes to underwriting and lending I'm not sure they will bring any added value. It is so competitive in the marketplace, how will they differentiate themselves?" (Image: Thinkstock)

Related Article: U.S. Has Little to Fear, Much to Gain, from Chinese Banks

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On what constitutes abusive banking practice:

"Another article where the consumer 'forgets their wallet' and has no responsibility for managing their own money. AND is given notice of the fees that may be charged but wants their goods and/or services immediately and gets them." (Image: Thinkstock)

Related Article: What's 'Abusive'? A $34 Fee for a $5 Overdraft


On the decline in web banking fraud:

"The risk of fraud losses through bad trading decisions and social engineering still make technology-led fraud a blip on the radar." (Image: Thinkstock)

Related Article: Web Banking Fraud Actually in Decline


On Bank of the West's use of dynamic pricing to retain customers:

"Customer Value Pricing, is enabling pioneering banks to more effectively target and acquire top prospects as well as maximize the depth, length and profitability--the value--of the relationships they already have." (Image: Thinkstock)

Related Article: Dynamic Pricing May Be the Key to Customer Retention: Bank of the West

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On Rep. Brad Miller's argument in favor of eminent domain mortgage seizures:

"Brad Miller is stark raving mad. The obvious problem with the eminent domain approach for acquiring mortgages is that a mortgage is in no way 'property'. Eminent Domain doesn't even apply." (Image: Bloomberg News)

Related Article: No Wonder Eminent Domain Mortgage Seizures Scare Wall Street


On Rep. Brad Miller's argument in favor of eminent domain mortgage seizures:

"Radical innovative ideas always follow a vacuum if it persists long enough. It's not about capitalism or anti-capitalism, or government intervention, at the core. It's about inequities that have existed far too long." (Image: Thinkstock)

Related Article: No Wonder Eminent Domain Mortgage Seizures Scare Wall Street


On Rep. Brad Miller's argument in favor of eminent domain mortgage seizures:

"Since our federal government is $16 trillion 'underwater' perhaps we should use eminent domain to garnish all of your federal pay, retirement benefits and healthcare??" (Image: Thinkstock)

Related Article: No Wonder Eminent Domain Mortgage Seizures Scare Wall Street

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On Rep. Brad Miller's argument in favor of eminent domain mortgage seizures:

"The implications of something like this are huge. First it can destroy investor money for fear of them investing in mortgages in the United States. But even more important that ruining the economy is our individual freedom." (Image: Thinkstock)

Related Article: No Wonder Eminent Domain Mortgage Seizures Scare Wall Street


On Rep. Brad Miller's argument in favor of eminent domain mortgage seizures:

"Spoken like a true politician who has no understanding of economics and no concern for the sanctity of contracts or individual rights." (Image: Thinkstock)

Related Article: No Wonder Eminent Domain Mortgage Seizures Scare Wall Street


On Rep. Brad Miller's argument in favor of eminent domain mortgage seizures:

"I was on a bank board for 12 years and we would never have treated our borrowers as shabbily as this current crop of bill collectors … I don't want his house and the attendant expenses and risks." (Image: Thinkstock)

Related Article: No Wonder Eminent Domain Mortgage Seizures Scare Wall Street

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On the counter-argument that seizing underwater mortgages is 'unconstitutional and dangerous':

"Absolutely horrible idea, and one we should fight against, tooth and nail. Contract rights and rule of law should come first!" (Image: Thinkstock)

Related Article: Seizing Underwater Mortgages: Unconstitutional and Dangerous


On the counter-argument that seizing underwater mortgages is 'unconstitutional and dangerous':

"Sounds like an effective way to discourage all future mortgage lending in those communities." (Image: Thinkstock)

Related Article: Seizing Underwater Mortgages: Unconstitutional and Dangerous