25 Most Powerful Women In Finance: 16-20

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Elizabeth Buse

16. Elizabeth Buse
Group Executive, International, Visa

In the year since Elizabeth Buse became head of Visa’s international sales and client services business, she’s delivered double-digit growth across the board—18% in Asia-Pacific, and 27% in the Central Europe/Middle East/Africa markets, for the year ended June 30. An emphasis on Asia last year was particularly fruitful in the debit arena, with 43% higher annual volume. Buse accomplished these milestones in part with a management restructuring in her markets that led to a ramping up of corporate engagement with local managers to better understand and penetrate regional markets for debit, mobile and other payments channels. Buse, based in Singapore, has been with Visa since 1998.

"Often, government is characterized as an impediment to business growth. I think that’s a mistake. By constructively engaging with policymakers and regulators and striving to understand their broader objectives, corporations can become trusted partners and unlock new opportunities."

Carla Harris

17. Carla Harris
Managing Director, Morgan Stanley

If you don’t know the difference between a mentor and a sponsor, you probably don’t know Carla Harris. A renowned speaker on career development, she has counseled countless finance professionals on the road to success. And she knows that of which she speaks. A veteran of Morgan Stanley’s M&A and equity syndicate departments, Harris was plucked in late 2009 to run the emerging manager platform at Morgan Stanley Investment Management. The initiative is intended to advise and nurture women- and minority-owned, long-only asset managers.

"If you have an agenda for your career, it will keep you from making emotional decisions about your career and it will also guide you with respect to the timing of making career moves or changes. Without one, you will be easily distracted by the external economic environment or the internal political environment around you."

Kathleen Murphy

18. Kathleen Murphy
President of Fidelity Personal Investing

The strategic force behind Fidelity’s dominance in individual retirement accounts and mutual-fund managed account programs, Kathleen Murphy has helped to grow Fidelity Personal Investing’s assets under administration from $730 billion when she joined the firm in 2009 to over $1 trillion in 2010. The former ING executive has expanded Fidelity’s branch network, opening 30 new locations since the beginning of 2010, while the firm’s retail brokerage business has gained market share among online brokers.

"Revere the customer. Respect and empower your employees. Inspire individual and collective acts of leadership at all levels of the organization."

Dominique Senequier

19. Dominique Senequier
CEO, AXA Private Equity

When the big U.S. banks started shedding non-core assets, AXA Private Equity was ready to pounce. Under CEO Dominique Senequier, who founded the subsidiary of the French insurer in 1996, AXA Private Equity in the past 18 months has scooped up private equity portfolios from Bank of America and Citigroup, in two deals valued at more than $1.7 billion apiece. Such acquisitions in the secondary market have helped to increase the firm’s assets under management or advisement to $28 billion.

"The pursuit of short-term gain has played havoc with many companies. The key to long-term success is developing strong and trusting relationships with your own employees and clients."

Susan Ehrlich

20. Susan Ehrlich
SVP of Next Generation Payments, JPMorgan Chase

Susan Ehrlich built a reputation as an innovator as the head of financial services at Sears, where she expanded the retailer’s layaway plans and launched an installment loan program, the first of its kind to be integrated into a merchant’s point-of-sale system. Her latest innovation? A job in a new role for JPMorgan Chase, which has tasked her with overseeing, from development to delivery, new payment services that cut across the bank’s consumer and card business lines.

"Never turn down a job that hasn’t been offered to you. What does this mean? When you hear about an opportunity, don’t eliminate it—or yourself—from consideration before you really know enough about it."

25 Most Powerful in Finance 1-5
25 Most Powerful in Finance 6-10
25 Most Powerful in Finance 11-15
25 Most Powerful in Finance 21-25

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