Slideshow 'Justice Is Not Only Blind, But Illiterate': Comments of the Week

Published
  • May 23 2014, 7:30am EDT

American Banker readers share their views on the most pressing banking topics of the week. As excerpted from the comments sections of AmericanBanker.com articles and from our social media platforms.

(Image: Thinkstock)


On Credit Suisse pleading guilty to helping Americans evade taxes in a settlement with U.S. authorities:

"Mind-boggling that the Justice Department could state on its website that 'there is no such thing as too big to jail' when no individual 'bankster' at Credit Suisse was prosecuted and no one actually went to jail. Once again, Justice proves that it is not only blind, but illiterate."

Related Article: What a Credit Suisse Guilty Plea Means for 'Too Big to Jail' Debate

(Image: Bloomberg News)

Content Continues Below


On the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's plan to atone for disparities in employee evaluations by paying most staff members as if they received the highest rating:

"In the real world, everyone is not the MVP. There is only one — ask LeBron."

Related Article: CFPB Employee Rating Disparities Go Beyond Just Race, Agency Says

(Image: Bloomberg News)


On the CFPB's explanation for disparities in employee evaluations based on race, age, location and other factors:

"Give them credit for acknowledging the issue, but blaming it on an evaluation system that 'was too sophisticated' cannot explain the disparities and a pattern of discrimination."

Related Article: CFPB Employee Rating Disparities Go Beyond Just Race, Agency Says

(Image: Bloomberg News)


On Citigroup's plan to bulk up in correspondent mortgage lending two years after shrinking the channel:

"We like this business. No, we hate this business. Wait, we like this business. Until we don't."

Related Article: CitiMortgage Wants to Get Big in Correspondent Lending Again

(Image: Bloomberg News)

Content Continues Below


On state and federal authorities' ongoing probes into sales of mortgage-backed securities:

"Interesting to see how the once former 'smartest guys in the room', the investors, can become victims while not having accountability for investing in collateral and capital structures they did not understand."

Related Article: Feds' MBS Force Has More Than a Dozen Probes

(Image: Thinkstock)


On Credit Suisse's $2.6 billion penalty for helping U.S. clients dodge taxes:

"No matter how large fines are, they punish stockholders more than those responsible."

Related Article: What a Credit Suisse Guilty Plea Means for 'Too Big to Jail' Debate

(Image: Bloomberg News)


On the politics behind labeling asset managers as systemically important financial institutions:

"My guess is that after November, FSOC will designate one (or more) of the large asset managers as systemically important. At that point, the lame duck Administration will not be worried about politics — it will be Mrs. Clinton's problem."

Related Article: It's Premature to Label Asset Managers as 'Systemic': Treasury Official

(Image: Bloomberg News)

Content Continues Below


On concerns that the Johnson-Crapo legislation housing finance reform bill would limit low- and moderate-income people's opportunities to become homeowners:

"The current system is cutting out the bottom third of the housing market in terms of income and credit scores. How much worse could Johnson-Crapo be?"

Related Article: Housing Finance Reform Should Be True Reform — Not Retrogression

(Image: Bloomberg News)


On a spate of consumer lawsuits that claim banks are liable for helping payday lenders break the law:

"As soon as banks begin to rid themselves of customers that the government has deemed inappropriate or risky, the very act of jettisoning those customers is considered an admission of guilt."

Related Article: Consumer Lawsuits Claim Banks Helped Payday Lenders Break Law

(Image: Bloomberg News)


On a CFPB study that advocates for credit scoring models to differentiate between medical debt and other kinds of debt:

"The models used to calculate a consumer's credit score are derived from the science of statistics, not social science. I think the CFPB may have confused these two disciplines."

Related Article: CFPB Study Targets Changes to Credit Scoring for Medical Debt

(Image: Thinkstock)

Content Continues Below


On banks that are working to upgrade their technology to better manage the demands of stress tests:

"Getting the banking data in the shape needed for supporting the needs of the regulatory authorities … is distinctly not a 'technical' exercise. I suspect strongly that the reason many banks have not addressed this adequately is directly because it is treated as an IT issue."

Related Article: Stress Tests Require Continuous Tech Upgrades, Bankers Say

(Image: Thinkstock)