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Who Should Lead the SEC?

Let the games begin. Mary Schapiro hadn't even officially announced her resignation before the New York Times and other media outlets were speculating on who might succeed her. Following is the current running list. Who do you think is the best choice? Should other names be included? Let us know in the comments section below. (Image: Bloomberg News)

Elisse Walter is already on the SEC commission and was appointed by President Obama to succeed Schapiro next month. The job is likely to be only temporary, however. Most observers believe Obama will eventually nominate a permanent successor. Although Walter's board term expired in June, by law she can remain on the board for another year before she must step down. (Image: Bloomberg News)

Mary Miller is currently the Treasury's Undersecretary for Domestic Finance, a job she has held since March. Prior to that, she was Treasury's assistant secretary for financial markets since Feb. 2010 and worked for 26 years at T. Rowe Price Group. Most observers see her as the favored candidate.

According to the New York Times, former Citigroup and Bank of America executive Sallie Krawcheck is also under serious consideration. Question: Would she continue to tweet if she got the job? (Image: Bloomberg News)

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Considered the dark horse of the race, some said Robert Khuzami, the SEC's enforcement chief under Schapiro, could also get the nod. (Image: Bloomberg News)

Simon Johnson is pushing Neil Barofsky, the former special inspector general for the Troubled Asset Relief Program, as Schapiro's successor. But the administration is unlikely to give the job to one of its most independent — and fierce — critics. (Image: Michael Chu)

It's natural to consider Sheila Bair, the former FDIC chair, as a potential successor to Schapiro, considering they both graced the cover of Time magazine together in 2010 as "The New Sheriffs of Wall Street." But it's unlikely Bair wants the job. (Image: Michael Chu)

Let the games begin. Mary Schapiro hadn't even officially announced her resignation before the New York Times and other media outlets were speculating on who might succeed her. Following is the current running list. Who do you think is the best choice? Should other names be included? Let us know in the comments section below.

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