Slideshow 'Get a grip, folks': Comments of the week

Published
  • June 28 2018, 10:00pm EDT
10 Images Total

Readers react to Capital One restricting data access, opine on whether or not the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's structure is unconstitutional, weigh in on Rep. Maxine Waters as Financial Services Committee chairman and more.

On a federal judge ruling that the CFPB's structure is unconstitutional:

“The CFPB is part of the Executive Branch but cannot be influenced by the Executive Branch, does not have to ask congress for appropriations but rather robs the piggy bank known as the Federal Reserve Bank with unlimited funds at their disposal, actions by CFPB can be implemented by one person and their internal administrative judges approve enforcement actions. Even if the Supreme Court says it is constitutional, it should not be allowed in America.”

Related: Another judge says CFPB structure is unconstitutional

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On the D.C. Circuit appearing skeptical of the claim by Leandra English, the chief of staff under former CFPB Director Richard Cordray, that she is the rightful acting director of the bureau:

“English should be fired simply for ‘the efficiency of the service.’ Her published calendars available at bureau's website show total inactivity. I'm sure there is a spot for her on Cordray's campaign in Ohio as a reward for partisan loyalty.”

Related: Chaos atop CFPB could get worse after appeals court ruling

On how Rep. Maxine Waters' public fights with President Trump could spill over into her potential leadership of the Financial Services Committee next year:

"At a time when political discourse has given way to polemics and histrionics, Waters would lead us like lemmings over the edge to lunacy. We need to return to reasoned debate based on shared values and mutual respect. If we are becoming an ungovernable society, it is the likes of Ms. Waters and her kindred spirits from both political poles that are taking us there. Get a grip, folks."

Related: Waters’ clashes with Trump just the beginning

Agreeing with an op-ed that slams banks’ fintech efforts for being too shallow:

“Fully in support of what you're saying here, as I have myself experienced this over and over again in different iterations during the last 5 years. There are many reasons to be skeptical that any positive change is about soon, though this would take up too much of this space.”

Related: Banks can’t partner themselves into digital relevancy

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On how banks see a need for airport branches even though they can be expensive and do not typically generate much new business:

"If ever there was a place for smart ATMs...." (via Twitter)

Related: Can airport branches be more than expensive billboards?

On how a looming court decision over who runs the CFPB could cause even more chaos at the bureau:

“The chaos at the [CFPB] departed with former Director Cordray last November. Acting Director Mick Mulvaney and crew have brought clarity, the rule of law, and respect for the U.S. Constitution.”

Related: Chaos atop CFPB could get worse after appeals court ruling

On policymakers considering an overhaul of the housing finance system:

“It would be much cleaner if they just came out and said the first step is receivership. That would allow a good bank bad bank textbook cleanup, would eliminate the bloated Enterprises salaries and clandestine lobbying and allow a thoughtful way to spin or sell the leftover assets and securitization platform.”

Related: Trump’s GSE plan: Familiar solution, familiar problems

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On Capital One restricting how bank data flows to some fintech apps:

“All kinds of interesting wrinkles in this. Consumer ownership of data, data security, [competition] between banks and fintechs, etc” (via Twitter).

Related: Capital One restricts third-party data access, upsets customers

On an argument that large credit unions be required to follow Community Reinvestment Act and executive compensation disclosure standards:

"Don't throw the baby out with the bathwater! Cap the credit unions at $10 billion or even $5 billion. Better to save the system for 5,550 credit unions even if the top 7-22 would have to convert to banks."

Related: Banklike credit unions should follow bank rules