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Free Back-up E-mail Offered

TALLAHASSEE, Fla.-The Florida Chamber of Commerce is offering a free emergency e-mail protection service available to all Florida businesses during the 2006 Hurricane Season.

The "Digital Disaster Preparedness" service is available to companies that have an Internet domain name and request the service online.

Developed with AppRiver, LLC, a FL-based business e-mail security services provider, the "Digital Disaster Preparedness" service will protect and preserve email traffic if businesses' IT infrastructures are vulnerable to hurricane-related damage.

For info: www.floridachamber.com or www.appriver.com.

California Has Levee Worries, Too

SACRAMENTO, Calif.-No hurricane has hit California in recorded history, according to Wikipedia. However, in addition to earthquakes and fires, the Golden State's capital city has something in common with New Orleans: an aging levee system.

The state has requested funding from the federal government to address an erosion problem that has led some to predict the possibility of flooding similar to what happened to the Crescent City after Hurricane Katrina blew through. Schools Financial CU CEO Jim Jordan says his CU is prepared.

"We have a business continuity plan and an alternate disaster recovery center," he told The Credit Union Journal. "Our data center is on high ground and is not subject to flooding."

"Water is on the list for all of us. Katrina put a little more urgency into getting things in place and tested," he said.

Treasury Pushing Go Direct

WASHINGTON-With the 2006 hurricane season kicking off this week, the U.S. Treasury Department is urging Social Security recipients along the Gulf Coast and Eastern seaboard to prepare by signing up for direct deposit to prevent any possible disruption in the delivery of their benefits checks.

The push to get more people signed up for direct deposit of their government checks is just one of the lessons from Hurricane Katrina last year, when Treasury and the Social Security Administration struggled to get payments to people displaced by the storms.

The Treasury launched its Go Direct automatic deposit campaign last September to encourage recipients of government checks to safeguard their funds by having them deposited electronically into their accounts.

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