Acting CFPB Director Mick Mulvaney
On an argument from a former Consumer Financial Protection Bureau official about how the agency can better foster innovation:

"Updating fintech regulations is a necessity recognized by lawmakers, yet this necessity has not been implemented. This article defines the problem and gives the solution. Is anyone listening?"

Related: Here’s what the CFPB’s sandbox should look like
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On a look into whether fintechs present a systemic risk to the banking system:

"This failure of oversight has been going on for years. The main card processing companies are independent and unregulated. They are the quintessential SIFI yet the Financial Stability council ignores them. If one of them goes down transactions would be massively disrupted nationally. A prudent level of regulation could start there with oversight of their financial condition, technology and developing contingent receivership plans."

Related: Are fintechs a systemic risk?
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Another reader weighs in on the risks fintechs could pose to the financial system:

"Along with all the well-laid out risks in this article is another scary prospect; loosely regulated fintech companies gaining access to the bank payments system. Despite rigorous operational controls, robust regulatory supervision and comprehensive audit oversight, cybersecurity is a constant and existential threat to the banking system. The possibility of a fintech with less stringent controls providing a port of entry for hackers to the broader payments system is a real nightmare."

Related: Are fintechs a systemic risk?
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An additional reaction to concerns that fintechs make the financial system more vulnerable:

"Along with all the well-laid out risks in this article is another scary prospect; loosely regulated fintech companies gaining access to the bank payments system. Despite rigorous operational controls, robust regulatory supervision and comprehensive audit oversight, cybersecurity is a constant and existential threat to the banking system. The possibility of a fintech with less stringent controls providing a port of entry for hackers to the broader payments system is a real nightmare."

Related: Are fintechs a systemic risk?
Sen. Elizabeth Warren
On an argument that there could soon be renewed attention on the Glass-Steagall Act:

"If (and it is a big If) the Dem's regain control of the House, they will be too busy focusing on impeachment and otherwise grandstanding to pay much attention to something as complex as Glass-Steagall. Plus, there is the matter of the Senate and Presidential Pen, which will likely stymie most anything coming out of a Democrat House. Repeal of GS is a long shot at best."

Related: Is Glass-Steagall poised for a political comeback?
Fannie Mae building
On Rep. Jeb Hensarling introducing legislation with Rep. John Delaney that would repeal Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and expand Ginnie Mae's role in the system:

"What an ineffective joke."

Related: Hensarling gives GSE reform another try
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On a look at whether the new bipartisan plan to overhaul the housing finance system, with mortgages backed by Ginnie Mae, could help move the debate forward:

"Ginnie Mae will not be the solution to the nation's housing market reform as long as the Housing Secretary or FHA's commissioner can set mortgage insurance premium rates through politics instead of math. We saw that with Shaun Donovan and Julian Castro but it remains to be seen at the next crisis whether Ben Carson will rule by partisan politics or actuarial science."

Related: How Ginnie Mae could break stalemate on GSE reform
Federal Reserve building in Washington, D.C.
Another response to a bipartisan plan to overhaul the housing finance market:

"Before you shut them down, first try and see what happens when you instruct the Federal Reserve to stop buying and reinvesting in virtually all their product. This proposal is uninformed on market forces."

Related: How Ginnie Mae could break stalemate on GSE reform
US Bancorp branch in Illinois.
On an argument that a new small-dollar installment program from U.S. Bank could open the door for other lenders:

"This is an idea which sounds good but the devil is in the details. My suspicion is that many potential small, short-term loan customers have credit and/or negative account histories which make them historically non-bankable. Banks will be forced to loosen standards, adding risk. Loans will likely be unprofitable at any acceptable rate because of the small size, operational costs and credit risk. If credit qualified, an existing product (a credit card) will solve the problem."

Related: Momentum is building for small-dollar loans
Mobile banking concept
On a community bank partnering with a fintech to offer a subscription service for mobile banking:

"Subscription? It's also know as a 'monthly maintenance fee,' and it's been around for decades."

Related: Can a subscription model work with mobile banking?