SAN DIEGO -- Chemical Banking Corp. and First Chicago Corp. have unveiled new cash-management software at a meeting of corporate treasurers.

First Chicago is introducing new personal computer-based payment-initiation software called First Window 2000 at the Treasury Management Association's annual conference here this week.

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And Chemical Bank is unveiling a new electronic tax payment service as well as new personal computer-based balance reporting software called series 2000.

Bankers hope that these and other products wow attendees at the largest gathering of U.S. corporate cash managers.

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"If a bank has anything new to offer, this is the place to show it," said Lori Nelson, First Chicago's vice president of global funds transfer products.

The Treasury Management Association's conference is expected to draw nearly 4,000 attendees, including a smattering of executives from the country's largest corporations.

First Windows 2000 is among the new technologies banks are offering to impress conference-goers. Cash managers will use the software to order electronic payments over Fed Wire, Chips, the automated clearing house network, or Swift.

Fundamentally, First Window 2000 is an upgrade to software First Chicago has sold for years.

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But the older software worked with only one payment network at a time and only ran on personal computers under the DOS operating system.

Miss Nelson predicted that the new software would give First Chicago a leg up in its cash management business.

"I don't believe anyone else has integrated this all onto one screen with Windows," she said.

Chemical's new Electronic Tax Deposit Service will enable corporations to make tax payments by telephone or by linking PCs with Chemical computers.

The service prompts customers for the proper entries, then sends payments and supporting information to the government.

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