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Plastic Perseveres
Some stores were reduced to accepting only cash. Others, running on generator power, still managed to accept credit and debit cards. (Image: Fotolia)
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Mobile Meltdown
With cell service impaired and many lacking the ability to keep their phones charged, mobile wallets and mobile card readers proved far less useful than cash and plastic cards in storm-struck areas. (Image: Fotolia)
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Dial-a-Donation
Those outside the storm's path, however, could use their phones' texting ability to access nonprofit mGive's system to donate $10 to one of eight different charities working to help in the recovery. Donations are added to users’ wireless bills. (Image: Fotolia)
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Prepaid Problems
Green Dot attributed slowed prepaid-card sales to the introduction of the Walmart/Amex Bluebird card last month, though it acknowledged that the storm impaired many of the retail chains it relies on for distribution. (Image: Fotolia)
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ATMs Assist
ATMs are not only dispensing cash — they are accepting it from donors that want to help storm victims. Wells Fargo allows people to donate to the American Red Cross through most of its 12,000 ATMs. (Image: Fotolia)
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Due Dates Shift
Many issuers preemptively announced they would waive penalties for card customers who could not get their bills paid in the storm's wake. (Image: Fotolia)
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Relief
Amex, MasterCard, JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America, Wells Fargo and others provided donations to charities to help storm-struck areas recover. (Image: Fotolia)
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