The Republican chairman of the House Oversight Committee is facing pressure from across the aisle to issue a subpoena in connection with a bank CEO who has been swept up in the Russia probe.

Stephen Calk, the CEO of Federal Savings Bank in Chicago, has been under scrutiny since it was reported that his bank made $16 million in mortgage loans to former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort in 2016 and early 2017.

Manafort, a key figure in the sprawling investigation of Russian meddling in the 2016 election, faces numerous criminal charges, including providing false information to banks in order to obtain loans.

Steve Calk
Stephen Calk, above, the CEO of Federal Savings Bank in Chicago, has been under scrutiny since it was reported that his bank made $16 million in mortgage loans to former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort.

Special prosecutor Robert Mueller has reportedly been investigating whether Calk made the loans to Manafort in exchange for the promise of a job in the Trump administration. The bank has denied that such a quid pro quo was ever proposed. Calk did not get a job in the administration, though The Wall Street Journal has reported that he did seek to be named Army secretary.

Back in February, Democratic Reps. Elijah Cummings of Maryland and Stephen Lynch of Massachusetts asked the Pentagon to turn over any departmental documents related to Calk.

But the Defense Department has not complied with the request, according to a letter that the two House Democrats sent Wednesday to House Oversight Chairman Trey Gowdy, a South Carolina Republican.

Cummings and Lynch asked Gowdy to issue a subpoena compelling the Pentagon to turn over relevant documents by April 11.

A Pentagon spokesperson said Wednesday that the Defense Department received the Feb. 27 letter from Cummings and Lynch, and expects to respond soon.

A spokeswoman for the House Oversight Committee did not respond to requests for comment.

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